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The Student News Site of Pembroke Pines Charter High School

CHAT News

The Student News Site of Pembroke Pines Charter High School

CHAT News

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Unity In Faith: MSA’s First Jummah

Unity+In+Faith%3A+MSA%E2%80%99s+First+Jummah
Justin Betancourt

As the first week back from winter break came to a close, the Muslim Student Association (MSA) at PPCHS announced their first Jummah prayer on January 12th. This event proposed a moment for all the students to gather around and strengthen their faith amongst their peers. 

 Jummah prayer is a spiritual recharge and is held every Friday at the mosque, which is a place of worship for Muslims. This event would serve as a time when students and staff come together in joint prayer that is followed by a sermon that often addresses current events and moral guidance. “Friday is a very blessed day for Muslims, and the Jummah prayer is the only prayer in the week that has a compulsory lecture before it. That lecture that’s given every Jummah could vary from one topic to another but it always falls under a reminder for the people. The Jummah prayer keeps Muslims on track and reminds them of their faith, keeps them away from their desires, and strengthens their faith,” explained Samira Butler, President of MSA. This prayer fosters a sense of togetherness and provides a moment of reflection among everyone.

Friday prayer is the most important prayer to be a part of because it’s a commitment and a reminder speech is given to keep Muslims on the right track, however the Jummah usually isn’t available for students to attend. Sophomore Daniel Salman expresses, “A lot of people can’t make it to the mosque for Jummah because of school timings, so it becomes hard to attend those prayers, so MSA chose to organize it at school to make it easier for everybody.”  To prepare for Jummah, MSA board members first came together to get the word out. Then, they transformed a simple classroom into a space of worship by moving all the desks around making enough space to accommodate everyone, and placing down colorful prayer mats. “The idea that we could all strengthen our community by fulfilling the sunnah of our Prophet PBUH, motivated us to advertise for Friday’s prayer. We all pitched in with extra prayer mats, and we all worked together to set up the classroom,” describes Butler. Having all of the students work together in preparation for this event and having a sense of enthusiasm set the tone for a successful and unifying Jummah prayer.

Following the prayer, many of the students and board members talked and thought about how it felt to be able to join and perform their faith together, especially in a school environment with their peers. For example, “ I remember having conversations about how long it’s been since they have attended Jummah and how fun it would be to have it again,” recalls Butler. Since many students weren’t able to go to the mosque, it felt good for the students to be able to know that they can read it at school and a pressure that can be lifted off their chest. “Participating in the prayer felt good and it made me feel closer to my peers,” expressed senior Hassan Maroof. This Jummah prayer was not just a regular prayer to many students as it was proof that there were only ways to connect with your classmates; strengthening their bonds and their spirits. 

As for many, participating in the Jummah prayer served as a profound reminder of the beauty in our schools’ diversity. It was a moment of unity that transcended academic pursuits and highlighted the school’s role as a comfortable ground for both education and spirit. Many students go on to agree on how amazing it feels to be able to practice their religion on campus with no judgment. “It made me feel safe as if there were little to no problems concerning our school environment and I could feel a little more human and free to do as I please,” shared Butler. Butler explains how comfortable and free she felt practicing her faith in school and having no worries about anything. 

Being in school and being able to practice your religion with fellow peers and knowing your school is open to that helps one grow, feel secure, and fosters a feeling where you can just be yourself. From a more personal perspective, the ability to practice my faith on campus as a Muslim and Pakistani teen shows the school’s support in many ways, like wanting us to have a right to our faith, recognizing diverse holidays and traditions, and accepting all different cultures. It helps us recognize Charter as a welcoming and safe place to all; no matter what background.

TASCPA
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Areeba Haq, Staff Writer
Hi! My name is Areeba Haq. I am a Staff Writer for the CHAT! I am currently a sophomore and this is my first year in newspaper! I am so excited for this year! I love cats, writing, and spending time with my family and friends! Feel free to contact me at [email protected]!

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