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The Student News Site of Pembroke Pines Charter High School

CHAT News

The Student News Site of Pembroke Pines Charter High School

CHAT News

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Consumer Electronics Show 2024

Consumer+Electronics+Show+2024
Evan Omana

CES (Consumer Electronics Show) 2024 just recently finished, and brought with it one of the most elaborate displays in CES history, attracting over 135,000 attendees and hosting over 4,300 exhibits (Consumer Technology Association). This year’s displays were special for one reason in particular: artificial intelligence. From the AI powered assistant robot “Ballie” by Samsung to MSI’s AI monitor that points out things on your screen in certain video games or even a crib with an AI baby translator and an AI toothbrush – yes, this is real –  artificial intelligence was absolutely everywhere. In fact, it became a semi-popular joke among the tech community that everything at CES just had the name “AI” slapped onto it to sound cool. This, however, may cause some issues. Mrs. Chaiken, at our very own school, has only had a handful of issues with students trying to use AI to do work, but it may not always be that way. “I think that one of the reasons why I don’t have that many is because the writing assignments here are very specific.” If things get worse and AI improves as demonstrated in this event, she said she may have to start having writing be done entirely in class by hand. 

It wasn’t just the AI that made waves, though. Gaming was front and center as always at CES, with the gaming tech enthusiasts having a ton of new content to look forward to. Graphics processor (GPU) company Nvidia displayed at the convention the RTX 4000 Super series, a refresh and update to their original 4000 series lineup, which provided bumps in performance and price reductions across the board, which finally put some of their products in a good light after about two years of being frowned upon for price gouging. Their opposing company, AMD, released a mainstream GPU for $350, the 7600xt, which was also received fairly positively. This GPU remains incredibly important as it hits that sweet mainstream price point where many would buy their GPUs at; it’s not too expensive, not too cheap, but right in that perfect middle point. Henri Humar, a freshman at PPCHS and a gamer himself, discussed how much he’d pay for a GPU and what factors should be considered when buying one. At his selected price point of about $300, he’d want “decent graphics, decent performance, [and] price-to-performance,” which this processor ticks all the boxes, and could make a significant difference in the gaming market. Aside from just GPUs, dozens of new motherboards, cooling systems, and the new central processor (CPU) Ryzen 8000 series for desktops. The new releases were pretty much all considered pretty good by the PC gaming community, which made this year’s CES generally seen as a success for them. However, the crazy tech didn’t just end with gaming. 

A wide variety of new and crazy laptops and phones were revealed with a ton of interesting features… most notably a ton of different AI focused abilities. One laptop in particular, the Asus Zenbook Duo, had two screens stacked on top of each other, and for a reasonable price. More prominent laptops featured from Asus were the new ROG Zephyrus and ROG Strix laptops, which are predicted to be some of the new best in the 2024 premium laptop market. As for phones, TCL released a whole new line of budget Android phones, which have a 120 hertz display and a full 8gb of random access memory, or RAM (Digitaltrends), which albeit isn’t very much but is a great step to bringing medium/high specs to a low budget. As for the high end products, Asus ROG once again made a splash with the ROG Phone 8, one of the most capable non-professional phones on the entire market with cooling fans, dual control buttons, a staggering 16gb of RAM, and the latest phone graphics on the market, making it one of the most premium options money can buy. Santiago Bogota-Leon had a few things to say about the phone market. “Max, I’d probably pay $800 [for a phone],” he said. He explained how he weighs entertainment value, the ability to play games on it, fast performance and connection speeds, as well as just plain old reliability. 

There were other miscellaneous things added, from cars to keyboards to the aforementioned AI toothbrushes, but nothing stuck out too much among the crowd of AI features on top of AI features. It’ll certainly be interesting this year to see what new technology from CES shows up at PPCHS this year.

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About the Contributors
Finn Phelps Crossman
Finn Phelps Crossman, Staff Writer
Hi! I’m Finn, a writer here at The CHAT. I’m currently a freshman, and it’s my first year as a member of the newspaper here. When I’m not in school, you could probably find me writing cyberpunk stories, playing video games with my friends, or watching entirely too much Star Wars. If needed, you can contact me at [email protected]
Evan Omana
Evan Omana, Graphics Editor
Hello, my name is Evan Omana! I'm currently a sophomore and this is my first year in the CHAT. This year I'll be the Graphics Editor. I like making art from photoshop, doing Krav Maga martial arts and playing guitar. I'm hoping to have the best year possible! If you ever need anything from me contact [email protected] or just say hi when you see me around!

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